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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling, that we may very well be able to meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over ten years, and in the long-term deficit and put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today because, as important as they all are, today we have a more urgent and immediate call, and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics very well so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i might add, oui an incredible debt of gratitude to many of you at the head table as well as those of you in the room. i know we don't have absolutely unanimity in this ballroom, nor do we in anyway ballroom, but we all know, everyone acknowledges, we have to do something. we have to act. i hope we're all agreed that there's a need to respond to the carnage on our streets and in our schools. i hope we all agree that mass shootings like the ones we witnessed in newton 34 days ago, cannot continue to be tolerated. that tragedy in all my yea
-term debt ceiling increase, and he was part of a group of five conservatives who blessed this deal on friday morning. jeb hencer ling of texas and steve of louisiana and jordan of ohio and ryan. so it remains to be seen whether that will be kind of a center of power going forward. host: as far as those five signing on to this deal, what's been talking about the members, especially on the republican side and -- will all of them go along with this? >> it's going to be tough for them, because they have to get 218 votes. the democrats have already signaled they are not going to provide any votes for this on their side of the aisle. i would say that would be so difficult for them to do when you have, you know, the last four chairman of the republicans senate committee saying they are onboard with this, it doesn't give, i mean, it seems it would be difficult for so. more ranking file members to say this is not good enough. i mean, it seems the right ones were onboard with this in a pretty significant way. >> i guess the timetables of this, where do we see next week and where do we go from there? >
and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they all are today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. i know we don't have unanimity in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do something. we have to act. and i hope we all agree, there is a need to respond to the carnage on our streets and in our schools. i hope we all agree that mass shootings like the one we witnessed in newtown 34 days ago cannot be continued to be tolerated. that tragedy has affected the public psyche in a way i have never seen before. the image of first graders, not only
sit here tonight on the eve of the inauguration on monday, on -- just days ahead of debt ceiling conversations, days after fiscal cliff negotiations. was that deal good for poor people? >> for 30 years, we have not addressed this issue, except for the wonderful work that you and cornel are doing in these wonderful people on the panel. politics has neglected the poor. one could say that there was a war on the poor rather than a war on poverty for much of this period. the united states has by far the most poverty of any of the high-income countries as a share of the population. we have the highest in quality. we have the most entrenched underclass. we have had the biggest increases of any quality by leastnd we've had the political response of any high- income countries, so we are standing out on our own. this has been a 30-year trend of soaring in comes at the top, stagnation in the middle, and falling through the floor on the bottom, and the political system has refused to address this for 30 years. so we have reached a calamitous situation in this country, but the fact of the mat
to a deal. next, john from tennessee. caller: good morning. i am calling about the debt ceiling. yes, it does need to be raised. because we have to pay our bills. if the government is allowed to borrow money and set their circumstances, then why is the private business sector not allowed to do that? the federal reserve has been shut down as far as to the bankers, as far as the this man being able to borrow money. the industry in the united states needs money to operate on and and. we need to be able to borrow money. if his mrs. are not allowed to expand and grow, how do they expect to pay the us -- these debts down the road? get these guys out of here. they do not need to be making a lifetime commitment. they have gotten old and senile and did not even know where they are. it is a shame that our government has gone this far. it is just terrible. host: thank you for the call. if you're just joining us, or listening on c-span radio, thank you for joining us. the question we are asking is whether or not you think the president can bypass congress to raise the debt ceiling. you can join
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)